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15 Greatest Tiki Drink Recipes

There’s a certain school of thought that if a cocktail has more than three ingredients then it’s not worth drinking. Well, there would be an entire subculture of tiki fanatics who would respectfully disagree with that notion. It would be a disservice to these Polynesian-inspired concoctions to call them mere jungle juices; a blindly-curated cornucopia of rums and fruit adorned with a paper umbrella with the sole purpose of getting you drunk. No. Even the less-famous tiki drinks were carefully put together through trial and error by some of the greatest minds in the history of mixology. Despite the number of bars out there with slushies filled with cheap rum and tropical-inspired names, true tiki cocktails are works of art, whether or not they come adorned with props and fruit wedges. Although, these drinks are only one aspect of tiki culture as a whole.

While it begins with the cocktails themselves, “tiki” is a mindset; a fully-realized nexus point of food, music, clothing, and decor that is just as important as what you imbibe upon. Of course, there are a plethora of drinks, both classics and house specialties, that have made their way throughout the sphere, being passed on from bartender to bartender, from lounge to lounge — or not, depending on how top-secret the recipes are. However, by now, hundreds have made it into public knowledge, which can make it hard when trying to immerse yourself into the realm for the very first time. That’s where we come in. Stepping foot into tiki culture might be daunting, but luckily we’ve put together a list of 15 tiki drink recipes every drinker should know to help you get your start.

The History Of Tiki Culture

From Beachcomber To Beachbum

You could say it all started, like many fads and ideas back in the day, at the World’s Fair. Specifically, the 1915 Panama–Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco, at which the Hawaiian Pavilion featured hula dancers and steel guitar players. This enticed many mainlanders who had never stepped foot on the islands of the South Pacific — or any island, for that matter. For the next two decades, however, this newfound enthusiasm remained relatively stagnant. The Great Depression and the absence of commercial air travel prevented Americans from experiencing the wonders of Hawaiian and Polynesian culture.

Prohibition lasted between 1920 and 1933, and with its repeal, many an entrepreneur decided it was the best time to open up their own bars. One former bootlegger in particular, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (who later changed his name to Donn Beach), launched his own Hollywood location called Don the Beachcomber. It was decked out in tropical jungle and Polynesian decor and filled with hula skirt-wearing waitresses. And most importantly, the drinks being served weren’t just enticing because of their exotic-inspired names and completely original presentation, but because of how carefully they were crafted.

Since rum was cheaper than other liquors, Beach played with different types of internationally-sourced labels, creating cocktail classics such as the Three Dots and a Dash, the Test Pilot, and his biggest hit, the Zombie, which found even greater success when an imposter version was sold at the New York World’s Fair in 1939. Post-Prohibition laws also stated that food was to be served at any bar, so Beach put items on the menu that included the pu pu platter (allegedly the first time it had been introduced in America) and other Asian- and South Pacific-inspired dishes.

In Northern California, another restauranteur by the name of Victor Bergeron owned a hunting-themed bar called Hinky Dink’s, which also opened up in 1934. After visiting Don the Beachcomber, he decided to retheme his own restaurant and change the name to Trader Vic’s. A talented mixologist in his own right, Vic’s most popular inventions were the Fog Cutter, the Scorpion, and, most notably, the Mai Tai.

Where Beach is credited with igniting the tiki bar boom and inventing much of what went into the culture’s aesthetics (and thus is called the “Father of Tiki”), it was Bergeron who widely popularized the trend due to his business savvy, expanding his restaurant into an international chain of, at one point, around two dozen locations worldwide.

Throughout the 1940s and ‘50s, both Don the Beachcomber and Trader Vic’s opened up numerous locations across the country, as did countless others who aspired to build their own empires. Returning GIs from WWII’s Pacific Theatre who had developed a taste for Polynesian culture and Hawaii’s statehood in 1959 further launched the tiki craze into a new phase. Hawaii and Polynesia were everywhere, from film and television to Broadway and music. As Hollywood began shooting on-location more in the ‘60s, Hawaii was an affordable place to find authentic (and expensive-looking) set pieces without paying international shooting fees.

40 years is a long time for any fad to last, but tiki pop managed to sweep the nation for that long due to its exotic mythos and immersive escapism, allowing mainlanders to access tropical locales even upon returning home from vacation. However, as kitsch was becoming redefined in the Disco era and cheap artificial mixers began taking the place of tiki cocktails’ traditionally fresh and high-quality ingredients, the trend faded. Few bars survived, with most of them dead by the ‘90s.

But thanks to the cyclical ways of nostalgia, tiki culture made a return, and it didn’t take too long. As a new generation of drinkers was old enough to long for an era they never experienced and a destination they longed to visit, retro-chic began to take hold toward the mid-’90s. And what began as a cultural quirk, if not a passing curiosity, soon became commonplace with the likes of enthusiasts inspired to authentically recreate old recipes.

Jeff “Beachbum” Berry’s series of books in the late-‘90s and early-’00s revitalized interest in tiki culture as bartenders, perhaps bored with making 200 Manhattans each day, longed for something more challenging and exotic. Mid-century modern was coming back in style by the end of the ‘00s and suddenly 30-somethings associated the architectural style with tiki — and rightfully so. Craft bars were cropping up all over and, suddenly, tiki was back, thanks to the likes of cocktail destinations like Smuggler’s Cove in San Francisco and Berry’s own Latitude 29 in New Orleans, both of which are must-visit establishments in their respective locales.

Today, tiki culture seems like it’s here to stay, for now. Who knows what the future holds, but while we’re here, let’s relax and grab a straw.

Easy Tiki by Chloe Frechette

First published in 2020, Chloe Frechette’s Easy Tiki shows the evolution of the culture, even today. With over 60 recipes inside, the book takes classic cocktails and makes them accessible. Tiki drinks have often had an ostensibly impenetrable wall that separates outsiders from those who have been making these concoctions for years, and Frechette offers some middle ground.

Purchase: $12

Smuggler’s Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki by Martin & Rebecca Cate

Since opening its doors back in 2009, San Francisco’s Smuggler’s Cove has become a mecca for tiki enthusiasts worldwide with its authentic ambiance and encyclopedic bartenders. Owner Martin Cate released a compendium of tiki culture some years later, with contributions from his wife Rebecca, featuring over 100 recipes and a personal narrative that carries it through.

Purchase: $17

Beach Bum Berry Remixed by Jeff Berry

If Smuggler’s Cove is a compendium for tiki culture, Beach Bum Berry Remixed serves as more of a black book of sorts. Boasting over 200 cocktail recipes unearthed from the Golden Age of tiki, including a few bespoke syrups, Beach Bum Berry Remixed combines Jeff Berry’s first two books, Intoxica! and Grog Log, while debuting some drinks for the very first time here, displaying the author’s exhaustive research and passion.

Purchase: $26

Beachbum Berry’s Sippin’ Safari by Jeff Berry

Jeff Berry helped perpetuate tiki culture when it mattered with his fourth book, Sippin’ Safari, when first released back in 2007. Unearthing nearly 70 more top-secret recipes and building upon his earlier works, the Bum interviews over 100 people involved in the mid-century tiki scene and tells some fascinating stories along the way.

Purchase: $33

Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide: Revised by Victor Bergeron

Trader Vic himself, Victor Bergeron, includes over 1,000 of his famous cocktail and food recipes in this 1972 revised edition of his legendary bartender’s guide, including the first-ever entry of the Mai Tai that he’s credited with inventing. Intended for professional use, Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide has very little narrative other than a chunk of pages early on. Nevertheless, this is a must-have for hardcore tiki enthusiasts by the legend himself.

Purchase: $89

Photo: Beachbum Berry

151 Swizzle

Just like most of Donn Beach’s tiki drinks, the 151 Swizzle has strong Caribbean origins. Based on the rum swizzle, which is the national drink of Bermuda and the namesake of the swizzle stick, Beach’s cocktail uses overproof Demerara rum for its flavor, allowing this drink to be a bit more flexible with the other ingredients, such as lime juice and bitters. This strong mix of 151 rum (the Demerara sort is much tastier and less paint thinner-like compared to something like Bacardi 151) and lime juice (among other things) was popular in the Hollywood location of Don the Beachcomber in the ‘60s and was traditionally served in the now-obscure metal swizzle cup.

151 Swizzle:

 

0.5oz fresh lime juice

0.5oz simple syrup

1.5oz 151-proof Demerara rum

1 dash Angostura bitters

6 drops pastis (can sub absinthe)

8oz crushed ice

Flash blend for 5 seconds on high speed. Pour unstrained into a tall glass, adding more crushed ice to fill.

Dust with nutmeg and garnish with a cinnamon stick.

 

Source: Don the Beachcomber via Beach Bum Berry Remixed

Photo: Smuggler’s Cove

Cobra’s Fang

Inspired by Beach’s summers in New Orleans when he was younger, Cobra’s Fang is similar to the faux-tiki drink of that city, the Hurricane, with both often featuring the elusive fassionola syrup — a mysterious, red-colored passion fruit-flavored syrup — which is believed by some to have been invented by Beach himself. First mixed up in the ‘30s, this cocktail goes along with the dangerous-named drinks of the era, which were to evoke ideas of the tropical jungles and shark-infested waters. The Cobra’s Fang was reportedly served in a tall curved mug, but some have disputed whether or not this is true. Like many of Beach’s recipes, other bars frequently tried to create their own version of the Cobra’s Fang, with some opting for the even more exotic-sounding “Sidewinder’s Fang” (pictured) for their libations.

Cobra’s Fang:

 

1.5oz 151-proof Demerara rum

0.5oz fresh lime juice

0.5oz orange juice

0.5oz fassionola (can sub passion fruit syrup)

0.25oz falernum

1 dash Angostura bitters

6 drops absinthe (can sub pastis)

8 oz crushed ice

Flash blend for 5 seconds on high speed. Pour into a pilsner glass. Garnish with a cinnamon stick.

 

Source: Don the Beachcomber via Beachbum Berry’s Sippin’ Safari

Photo: Smuggler’s Cove

Doctor Funk

The foundation for Donn Beach’s Doctor Funk was a concoction invented by the real-life doctor of author Robert Louis Stevenson who treated him during his final days in Samoa in the late 19th century. Funk was also a mixologist and his combination of absinthe and lemonade was documented by travel writer Frederick O’Brien in his 1919 novel White Shadows In the South Seas. Beach added some other ingredients and changed it once or twice over the years. Beachbum Berry’s version adds in soda water so you don’t have to use a blender.

Doctor Funk:

 

1.5oz light Puerto Rican rum

0.75oz fresh lime juice

0.5oz grenadine

1tsp pastis (can sub absinthe)

1oz club soda

Shake everything but the soda together with ice cubes and add the club soda. Stir. Pour unstrained into a pilsner glass.

 

Source: Don the Beachcomber via Beach Bum Berry Remixed

Photo: Shutterstock

Fog Cutter

If you decide to take on the Fog Cutter, make sure you have someone to drive you home. Called the “Long Island Iced Tea of exotic drinks” by Beachbum Berry, this blend of rum, gin, and brandy doesn’t allow you to have very many. Trader Vic’s third most famous drink behind the Mai Tai and Scorpion bowl, the Fog Cutter was eventually revised in the ‘50s with added ice for blending and less liquor to make it less stiff. Unique in that it floats cream sherry on top, this cocktail has seen several iterations that swap the Spanish wine with the likes of aquavit or drop it altogether. It was historically served in an eponymous ceramic mug.

Samoan Fog Cutter (Revised Version):

 

1.5oz light Puerto Rican rum

2oz fresh lemon juice

1oz orange juice

0.5oz brandy

0.5oz gin

0.5oz orgeat syrup

0.5oz cream sherry

8oz crushed ice

Pour everything but the sherry into a blender and blend for under 10 seconds. Pour unstrained into a large tiki mug and float the sherry on top.

 

Source: Trader Vic via Beachbum Berry Remixed

Photo: Randy Schmidt c/o Beachbum Berry’s Latitude 29, New Orleans

Jungle Bird

It’s difficult to find many tiki staples that weren’t invented by either Donn Beach or Vic Bergeron. Case in point, the Jungle Bird was crafted at the Aviary Bar in the Kuala Lumpur Hilton in the late ‘70s where it was garnished with a cherry, pineapple wedge, and pineapple leaves to resemble, you guessed it, a jungle bird. Notable for its inclusion of the atypical tiki ingredient Campari, this bitter cocktail has become a favorite at tropical-themed bars around the globe in recent years, including the Aviary Bar, which is still in existence today.

Jungle Bird:

 

4oz unsweetened pineapple juice

1.5oz dark Jamaican rum

0.75oz Campari

0.5oz fresh lime juice

0.5oz simple syrup

Shake well with ice cubes and pour unstrained into a double old fashioned glass or tiki mug. Garnish with an orchid and a cocktail cherry speared to lemon and orange wheels for a tropical bird-like look.

 

Source: Aviary Bar via Beach Bum Berry Remixed

Photo: Beachbum Berry

Mai Tai

It makes sense that the most famous and popular tiki drink of all time would be the subject of a lawsuit. Even after Vic Bergeron won the court settlement claiming him to be the sole inventor of the drink, the contentious origins of the Mai Tai are still a hot topic of discussion. Donn Beach claimed the cocktail to be a simple derivative of his popular Q.B. Cooler — which, looking at their ingredient lists, seems dubious — but nevertheless, the Mai Tai, as we know it today, debuted at Bergeron’s Oakland restaurant in 1944 long before making a 1961 cameo in Elvis Presley’s Blue Hawaii. The original recipe for this quintessential tiki drink was kept top-secret by Bergeron until he unveiled it in the 1972 revision of his Bartender’s Guide book. Still, for some reason, many bars today will whip up some abomination with pineapple juice, orange juice, and a rum float and call it a Mai Tai. Here’s how to properly make one.

Mai Tai:

 

1oz dark Jamaican rum

1oz aged Martinique rum

1oz fresh lime juice

0.5oz orange Curaçao

0.25oz orgeat syrup

0.25oz rock candy syrup (2:1 sugar-to-water ratio simple syrup)

Shake well with lots of crushed ice and pour unstrained into a double rocks glass, adding more crushed ice if needed. Garnish with a lime wedge and mint sprig.

 

Source: Trader Vic’s, adapted from Beach Bum Berry Remixed

Photo: Beachbum Berry

Navy Grog

Inspired by the rum rations given to the British Navy in the 18th century, Navy Grog typically uses three types of rum. Donn Beach and Vic Bergeron both utilize equal parts light, dark, and gold rums with some combination of lime and grapefruit juices. But where Beach uses honey syrup, compared to the exotic tropical syrups in his other drinks, Bergeron’s has allspice dram. And while Beach created the original drink, it’s Vic’s that has better stood the test of time, with legend holding it as a mid-century favorite of Frank Sinatra, Richard Nixon, and Phil Spector, who allegedly had two the night he shot Lana Clarkson.

Navy Grog:

 

1oz blended lightly aged rum (e.g. Mount Gay Eclipse)

1oz column still aged rum (e.g. Cruzan Single Barrel)

1oz pot still lightly aged overproof rum (e.g. Smith & Cross)

0.25oz Demerara simple syrup

0.25oz allspice dram

0.75oz fresh white grapefruit juice

0.75oz fresh lime juice

Flash blend for 5 seconds on high speed. Strain into a double old fashioned glass with a cone of crushed ice frozen around the straw.

 

*For the Don the Beachcomber version, sub the allspice dram and simple syrup for 1oz of a 1:1 honey-water mixture and 0.75oz club soda.

 

Source: Trader Vic’s via Smuggler’s Cove

Photo: Shutterstock

Painkiller

Arguably the most famous tiki cocktail not attributed to Bergeron or Beach, the Painkiller is a refreshing blend of dark rum, coconut cream, pineapple juice, and orange juice, garnished with cinnamon and nutmeg. Invented at the Soggy Dollar Bar in the British Virgin Islands in 1971, this drink traditionally uses Pusser’s Rum, which has a trademark on the name. The Soggy Dollar is still serving these up today, but if you’d like to pay a visit, you’ll have to swim there since the beachfront bar is completely surrounded by water, thus giving it its name.

Painkiller:

 

4oz unsweetened pineapple juice

1oz orange juice

1oz Lopez coconut cream

2.5oz Pusser’s Navy Rum (or dark Jamaican rum)

Powdered cinnamon

Ground nutmeg

Shake the rum, juices, and coconut with lots of crushed ice. Pour unstrained into a tall glass or tiki mug. Dust with cinnamon and nutmeg and garnish with pineapple chunk, cinnamon stick, and orange wheel.

 

Source: Soggy Dollar Bar via Beach Bum Berry Remixed

Photo: Beachbum Berry

Pearl Diver

Becoming one of Beach’s more elusive cocktails throughout the years, the Pearl Diver found a resurgence thanks to Beachbum Berry. Invented in 1937, the blended drink features Beach’s own Gardenia Mix, a curious blend of butter, honey, cinnamon syrup, vanilla syrup, and allspice dram. The combination is something magnificent, but only if you do it just right. Its novelty called for a namesake glass, also invented by Beach, which sported ribbed sides all the way up to a bulbing neck. The glass became extinct by the ‘70s but has since been resurrected by Beachbum Berry and Cocktail Kingdom.

Pearl Diver:

 

1.5oz gold Puerto Rican rum

0.5oz fresh lime juice

0.5oz orange juice

0.5oz Demerara rum

0.5oz Don’s Gardenia Mix*

1 dash Angostura bitters

4oz crushed ice

Blend at high speed for 20 seconds. Strain through a fine-mesh wire sieve into a Pearl Diver glass or other tall glass, add ice to fill.

 

*Combine and whisk into a saucepan on medium heat: 1 cup each of unsalted butter and orange blossom honey, 1oz cinnamon syrup, 0.5oz allspice dram, and 0.5oz vanilla syrup. Use before cooling.

 

Source: Don the Beachcomber via Beachbum Berry’s Sippin’ Safari

Photo: Shutterstock

Planter’s Punch

Perhaps embodying the spirit of tiki drinks in its purest, most minimalist state, the Jamaican-born Planter’s Punch was first discovered by Donn Beach during his summers spent with his grandfather in New Orleans as a rum-runner during Prohibition. This may have started not only his love affair with tropical concoctions but served as the informant of such. Taking the oft-paraphrased rhyme, “One of sour, two of sweet, three of strong, four of weak,” Beach went through a lot of trial and error to get the recipe right, which, if you asked him, he never did (at one point there were five different permutations of the punch on his menu). But the breakthrough came when he discovered he should flash blend the mix so that it doesn’t dilute as easily, thus producing a template for many tiki drinks to come.

Planter’s Punch:

 

1oz gold Virgin Islands rum

0.5oz dark Jamaican rum

0.5oz gold Jamaican rum

0.5oz fresh lime juice

0.5oz simple syrup

0.5tsp grenadine

0.5tsp falernum

2 dashes Angostura bitters

6oz crushed ice

Flash blend on high for 5 seconds and pour unstrained into a tall glass.

 

Source: Don the Beachcomber via Beach Bum Berry Remixed

Photo: Randy Schmidt c/o Beachbum Berry’s Latitude 29, New Orleans

Scorpion

Pull out your longest straws and enjoy this communal drink, which is typically served in a bowl for you and several of your closest friends — or, you know, just you — to enjoy. Originating at Trader Vic’s, the Scorpion’s origins may have been inspired by a similar cocktail discovered by Bergeron during a trip to Honolulu, which consisted of liquor made from the indigenous ti plant. It’s gone through several iterations over the years, including by Vic himself, with some including gin, wine, and even champagne. Popularizing the bowl drink, the Scorpion has since become synonymous with it.

Scorpion:

 

6oz light Puerto Rican rum

6oz orange juice

4oz fresh lemon juice

1.5oz orgeat syrup

1oz brandy

16oz crushed ice

Blend for up to 10 seconds. Pour unstrained into a tiki bowl, garnish with a gardenia, and get yourself some long straws. Serves 2 to 4 people.

 

Source: Trader Vic’s via Beach Bum Berry Remixed

Photo: Smuggler’s Cove

Test Pilot

Mid-century tiki drinks were often inspired by WWII, with the rise of aviation having a particular impact. Nowhere was that more evident than with this Donn Beach creation. Whether it was called the Jet Pilot or Ace Pilot — or during the Space Race, the Space Pilot or Astronaut — the Test Pilot was one of Donn Beach’s most copied drinks. Revised in 1941, the best-known version features a unique blend of Cointreau and the spiced syrup falernum, along with two types of rum, for a rich and citrusy profile, with a signature and necessary addition of pastis (or absinthe) for added depth.

Test Pilot:

 

1.5oz dark Jamaican rum

0.75oz light Puerto Rican rum

0.75oz fresh lime juice

0.5oz falernum

0.5oz Cointreau

1 dash Angostura bitters

6 drops pastis (can sub absinthe)

8oz crushed ice

Flash blend on high for 5 seconds. Pour unstrained into a double old fashioned glass. Add more crushed ice to fill and garnish with a cocktail cherry speared to a wooden oyster fork (or, lacking one of those, a toothpick).

 

Source: Don the Beachcomber via Beach Bum Berry Remixed

Photo: Smuggler’s Cove

Three Dots and a Dash

This World War II-era quaff was an early favorite of Don the Beachcomber regulars. Named after the Morse code for “V” or “victory,” the Three Dots and a Dash is traditionally garnished with three cherry “dots” and a pineapple “dash,” although this drink itself instead leans citrus thanks to lime and orange juices. Another thing that makes it so special is the inclusion of Haitian-style sugarcane-based rum — known as rhum agricole — instead of the typical molasses-based rums used for other cocktails. Finally, with a combo of honey, allspice, and falernum, the Three Dots exudes a noticeable hit of spice.

Three Dots and a Dash:

 

1.5oz rhum agricole vieux (can sub amber Martinque rum)

0.5oz blended aged rum (can sub Demerara rum)

0.5oz fresh lime juice

0.5oz orange juice

0.5oz honey syrup (1:1 honey to hot water)

0.25oz falernum

0.25oz allspice dram

1 dash Angostura bitters

12oz crushed ice

Flash blend on high for 5 seconds. Pour unstrained into a footed pilsner glass and garnish with three maraschino cherries speared to a pineapple frond with a cocktail stick.

 

Source: Don the Beachcomber via Beachbum Berry’s Sippin’ Safari, adapted by Smuggler’s Cove

Photo: Shutterstock

Tropical Itch

More proof that Beach and Bergeron didn’t have a monopoly on tropical concoctions, the Tropical Itch was invented around 1957 by Harry Yee, head bartender at the Hilton Hawaiian Village in Waikiki. The drink quickly became a favorite and was famous for having a large dose of passion fruit juice and for being served with a backscratcher. A couple of years later, Yee came up with the idea of putting small paper umbrellas in his drinks — an idea that spread like wildfire, even if it became a misrepresentation of these so-called “umbrella drinks.” Yee was one of the most impactful bartenders of the era, helping to spread tiki’s popularity and inventing other popular drinks like the Blue Hawaii and Hawaiian Eye.

Tropical Itch:

 

8oz passion fruit juice or nectar

1.5oz amber 151-proof rum

1oz dark Jamaican rum

1oz bourbon

0.5oz Curaçao

2 dashes Angostura bitters

Fill a hurricane glass with crushed ice, then add all ingredients and swizzle until cold. Garnish with a pineapple stick, mint sprig, orchid, and wooden backscratcher.

 

Source: Harry K. Yee via Beach Bum Berry Remixed

Photo: Beachbum Berry

Zombie

What could have easily been an unwelcoming cacophony of flavors has endured over the years as one of tikidom’s most beloved cocktails. Before the Mai Tai took the crown, the Zombie was the king of tiki drinks and ignited enthusiasm for the trend ever since it was invented in 1934 by Donn Beach himself at his Hollywood location. After an imitator made his own and passed it off as the original at the 1939 World’s Fair in New York, the word of the Zombie spread like the plague (a Zombie plague, if you will). But since Beach kept his original recipe under tight wraps — and, on top of that, constantly changed it over the years — nobody knew how to truly make their own. Bartenders resorted to throwing a bunch of rums and fruit juices together until this practice became the norm. Fortunately, Beachbum Berry decoded Beach’s original recipe and published the ten-ingredient recipe in his book Intoxica! decades later.

Zombie:

 

0.75oz fresh lime juice

0.5oz Don’s mix (equal parts cinnamon syrup and fresh white grapefruit juice)

0.5oz falernum

1.5oz gold Puerto Rican rum

1.5oz aged Jamaican rum

1oz 151-proof Demerara rum

1 dash Angostura bitters

6 drops pastis (can sub absinthe)

1tsp grenadine

6oz crushed ice

Flash blend on high for no more than 5 seconds. Pour unstrained into a chimney glass and add ice cubes to fill. Garnish with mint sprig.

 

Source: Don the Beachcomber via Beachbum Berry Remixed

30 Classic Cocktails You Should Know

If you want to try your bartending skills with some more iconic drinks, check out our list of the 30 classic cocktails you should know.

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